arlenesway.com.au Loose weight with Arlene Normand

March 8, 2015

Meat Recipes

Filed under: Meat — Arlene @ 4:07 am

Asian beef stir-fry

Ingredients (serves 4)                   1 serve = 1 protein, 2 carbohydrates

500g hokkien noodles

2 tsp olive oil

400g lean beef rump steak, excess fat removed, thinly sliced across the grain

200g broccoli, cut into small florets

2 medium zucchini, cut into thick sticks

150g green beans, topped, diagonally sliced

1 tbs water

2 tbs hoisin sauce (Ayam brand)

2 tbs soy sauce

Method

Place the noodles in a large heat-resistant bowl and cover with boiling water. Stand for 5 minutes and then drain well. Set aside.

Meanwhile, heat 1/2 the olive oil in a large wok over high heat. Add the beef and stir-fry for 2-3 minutes or until just cooked. Remove from the wok and set aside.

Add the remaining olive oil and reduce heat to medium-high. Add the broccoli, zucchini and beans. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add the noodles and water. Cover and cook, tossing occasionally, for 1-2 minutes or until the vegetables are tender but crisp.

Return beef to the wok with the hoisin sauce and soy sauce. Toss until well combined and heated through. Serve immediately

 

Asian beef & vegetable casserole

Ingredients (serves 8)              1 serve = 1 protein

2 tbs plain flour

1.5kg beef casserole steak (such as chuck steak or gravy beef), cut into 4cm pieces

2 tbs olive oil

1 brown onion, halved, thinly sliced

3 carrots, peeled, cut into 2cm-thick slices

4 whole star anise

4cm-piece fresh ginger, peeled, thinly sliced

2 stems lemon grass, pale section only, halved

500ml (2 cups) beef stock

125ml (1/2 cup) brandy

90g (1/3 cup) tomato paste

300g green beans, topped

Fresh coriander leaves, to serve

Steamed rice, to serve

Method

Preheat oven to 180°C. Place the flour on a plate. Season with salt and pepper. Add the beef and toss to coat. Shake off any excess.

Heat half the oil in a 4L (16-cup) capacity flameproof, ovenproof casserole dish over medium heat. Add half the beef and cook for 2-3 minutes each side or until brown. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with remaining oil and beef, reheating the dish between batches.

Add the onion and carrot to the pan and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until onion is soft. Add the star anise, ginger and lemon grass, and stir to combine.

Add the beef, stock, brandy and tomato paste to the dish. Cover and bake for 1 1/2 hours or until the beef is tender.

Meanwhile, cook the beans in a medium saucepan of boiling water for 3-4 minutes or until bright green and tender crisp. Drain.

Add the beans to the beef mixture and stir to combine.

Top the beef mixture with coriander. Serve with steamed rice.

 

 ASIAN STYLE MEATBALLS

400g minced beef                                        2 teaspoons finely grated fresh ginger

1 clove garlic, crushed                               1/2 cup stale breadcrumbs

2 tablespoons soy sauce                           1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 egg, lightly beaten                                   2 Tblsp finely chopped fresh coriander

cooking oil spray

PLUM SAUCE

1/3 cup plum sauce                                     ¼ cup chicken stock

1. Combine beef, ginger, garlic, breadcrumbs, sauce, oil, egg and coriander; mix well. Cover; refrigerate for 1 hour.

2. Roll level tablespoons of mixture into balls. Spray a heated non-stick fry pan with oil; add pork balls, in batches. Cook, turning frequently, until browned and cooked through.

3. Plum Sauce. Combine sauce and stock in a small bowl; mix well.

4. Serve meatballs with Plum Sauce.

Serves 4                     1 serve = 1 protein

 

 

ASPARAGUS AND BEEF STIR-FRY

2 tablespoons soy sauce                             1 tablespoon cornflour

1 teaspoon sesame oil                                 1 cup vegetable stock

½ teaspoon chilli flakes                     1 teaspoon vegetable oil

500g eye fillet steak, thinly sliced               1 clove garlic, crushed

1 bunch asparagus, chopped                      6 spring onions, chopped

100g snow peas, trimmed

1. Combine sauce, cornflour, oil, stock and chilli flakes in a bowl.

2. Heat vegetable oil in a non-stick wok or pan; add beef, in batches, stir-fry until browned. Remove from wok.

3. Add garlic, asparagus and spring onions; stir-fry for 2 minutes or until asparagus is tender. Return beef with snow peas and soy mixture; stir until sauce boils and thickens.

Serves 4               1 serve = 1 protein

 

Baby beet, lamb and spinach salad

Ingredients (serves 4)                         1 serve = 1 protein

500g lamb backstraps

1/3 cup olive oil

100g baby spinach leaves

75g feta cheese, crumbled

425g can baby beets, drained, halved

1/3 cup walnuts, toasted

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

Method

Preheat a barbecue plate or chargrill over medium-high heat. Brush lamb with 1 tablespoon of oil. Season with salt and pepper. Cook lamb for 5 minutes each side for medium or until cooked to your liking. Remove to a plate. Cover with foil. Set aside for 5 minutes to rest.

Combine spinach, feta, beets and walnuts in a large bowl. Thinly slice lamb. Add to salad. Toss to combine.

Combine vinegar and remaining oil in a jug. Season with salt and pepper. Drizzle over salad. Serve.

 

 

Baked lamb chops with pumpkin

Ingredients (serves 4)                       1 serv e= 1 protein 1 carbohydrate

1 (680g) golden nugget pumpkin, cut into wedges, deseeded

Olive oil cooking spray

8 lamb loin chops, trimmed

1 cup orange marmalade

1/4 cup orange juice

2cm piece ginger, peeled, finely grated

175g baby green beans, trimmed, steamed

Method

Preheat oven to 200°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Place pumpkin wedges onto prepared tray. Spray with oil. Season with salt and pepper. Bake for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, place chops into a large ovenproof baking dish. Combine marmalade, orange juice and ginger in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon mixture onto chops. Turn to coat. Place chops into oven under pumpkin. Bake both for a further 35 minutes or until chops are cooked through and pumpkin is golden and tender. Place chops onto serving plates. Drizzle with pan juices. Serve with pumpkin and beans.

 

 

 

 

 

Balsamic lamb and beetroot salad

Ingredients (serves 4)              1 serve = 1 protein

2 garlic cloves, crushed           1/3 cup balsamic vinegar

3 (400g) lamb leg steaks, trimmed    olive oil cooking spray

80g baby rocket                       1 medium red capsicum, chopped

1 small red onion, thinly chopped

1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

425g can baby beets, drained, halved

60g reduced-fat feta cheese, crumbled

Method

Combine garlic and 2 tablespoons vinegar in a shallow glass or ceramic dish. Add lamb. Season with salt and pepper. Turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 15 minutes to allow flavours to develop.

Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Spray lamb with oil. Cook for 3 minutes each side for medium or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate. Cover with foil to keep warm.

Combine rocket, capsicum onion, parsley, baby beets and remaining vinegar in a large bowl.

Cut lamb into 1cm-thick slices. Place rocket mixture on a serving plate. Top with lamb slices and feta. Serve.

 

Barbecued chilli and sesame beef with red cabbage slaw

Ingredients (serves 4)                         1 serve = 1 protein

2 tbs sesame seeds                               2 garlic cloves, peeled

2 tsp sambal oelek (see note)               1/4 cup (60ml) soy sauce

1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar                    1/4 cup (60ml) white vinegar

2 tbs vegetable oil

4 (about 600g) thick boneless sirloin (New York cut) steaks, fat trimmed, thinly sliced

1/4 (about 300g) red cabbage, thinly sliced

3 green onions, trimmed, thinly sliced

3 red radishes, cut into matchsticks

Steamed rice, to serve

Method

Preheat barbecue on high. Place sesame seeds in small frying pan over low heat and cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until toasted. Transfer seeds and garlic to a mortar and pound with a pestle until smooth. Add the sambal oelek, soy sauce, sugar, vinegar and oil, and stir to combine.

Place beef slices in a medium bowl and stir through 1/4 cup of the sesame mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

Combine cabbage, green onion, radish and half of remaining dressing in a bowl.

Cook beef on barbecue for 1 minute each side or until browned and just cooked. Toss steak in remaining dressing.

Divide the cabbage mixture among serving dishes. Top with beef and serve immediately with steamed rice, if desired.

Notes

Sambal oelek is a chilli paste found in the Asian section of supermarkets.

 

 

Barbecued mustard veal cutlets

Ingredients (serves 4)              1 serve = 1 protein

60ml (1/4 cup) dry white wine                    2 tbs tamari (wheat-free soy sauce)

1 tbs wholegrain mustard                           1 garlic clove, crushed

4 veal cutlets, excess fat trimmed              

Salt & freshly ground black pepper

salad, to serve

Method

Combine the wine, tamari, wholegrain mustard and garlic in a large glass or ceramic bowl.

Add the veal cutlets and toss to coat in the marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 10 minutes to develop the flavours.

Preheat a barbecue grill or chargrill pan on high. Remove the veal cutlets from the marinade and reserve the marinade. Season veal cutlets with salt and pepper. Cook on grill for 2 minutes each side. Reduce heat to medium and cook, basting the cutlets frequently with the reserved marinade, for a further 4-5 minutes each side for medium or until cooked to your liking. Divide the veal cutlets among serving plates and serve with salad.

BEEF AND RED WINE CASSEROLE

2 teaspoons oil                                           400g diced beef

3 medium onions, quartered                       2 cloves garlic, crushed

250g button mushrooms                            3/4 cup dry red wine                        

1/4 cup steak sauce                                     salt and pepper to taste

1. Heat half the oil in a large pan; add beef, in batches, cook until browned all over. Remove from pan.

2. Heat remaining oil in same pan, add onions, garlic; cook, stirring, until onions are lightly browned.

3. Return beef to pan with mushrooms, wine and sauce. Bring to boil; simmer, covered, for about 1 hour, stirring occasionally, or until beef is tender. Season with salt and pepper before serving.

Serves 4                                            1 serve = 1 protein

Beef in black bean sauce

Ingredients (serves 4)              1 serve = 1 protein

2 teaspoons cornflour                                

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon black bean sauce

1 tablespoon hot chilli sauce

1/4 cup chicken stock

1 1/2 tablespoons peanut oil

600g beef rump steak, trimmed, very thinly sliced

1 medium brown onion, cut into wedges

1 medium green capsicum, cut into 2cm pieces

1 garlic clove, crushed

2cm piece fresh ginger, peeled, grated

100g cup mushrooms, sliced

3 green onions, cut into 5cm lengths

Method

Whisk cornflour and soy sauce in a jug until smooth. Stir in black bean sauce, chilli sauce and stock.

Heat a wok over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon oil. Swirl to coat. Cook beef, in batches, for 1 to 2 minutes or until browned. Transfer to a bowl.

Heat remaining oil in wok. Add brown onion. Stir-fry for 2 minutes or until softened. Add capsicum, garlic and ginger. Stir-fry for 3 to 4 minutes or until capsicum is just tender. Add mushroom. Stir-fry for 2 minutes or until softened.

Return beef and juices to wok. Add sauce mixture. Stir-fry for 2 to 3 minutes or until sauce boils and thickens. Add green onion. Toss to combine. Serve.

 

 

Beef Fillets with Spiced Honey Sauce

1 medium carrot

4 green shallots

100grams green beans

Oil spray

4 small beef eye fillet steaks (300 grams)

Spiced Honey Sauce

10 grams butter

½ teaspoon grated fresh ginger

1-teaspoon honey

2 teaspoons light soy sauce

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

1 Tablespoon water

 

Cut carrot into thin 10 cm strips.  Cut shallots and beans into 10 cm lengths.  Boil, steam or microwave vegetables until just tender, drain.

Spray non-stick pan, add steaks, cook until tender and done as desired.  Serve steaks with vegetables, drizzled with spiced honey sauce. 

Spiced Honey Sauce: Heat butter in pan, add ginger, cook, stirring, about 1 minute or until aromatic.  Add honey, sauces and water, stir over heat until boiling.

 

Serves 2               1 serve = 1 protein

 

Beef salad

Ingredients (serves 4)                       1 serve = 1 protein

1/2 cup sweet chilli sauce                           2 tablespoons fish sauce

1/4 cup lime juice (2 to 3 limes)                  1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 Lebanese cucumber, diced                       3 tomatoes, finely chopped

1 small red capsicum, diced                        4 large sirloin steaks

1 small red onion, finely chopped               

1/4 cup coriander leaves (optional)

Method

Combine sauces, juice and sugar in a bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until required.

Combine cucumber, tomatoes, capsicum, onion and salt and pepper in a large bowl. Cover and refrigerate until required.

Preheat a barbecue or chargrill on high. Season steaks with salt and pepper and cook for 3 to 4 minutes on each side for medium, or to taste. Remove to a plate, cover with foil and rest for 10 minutes.

Thinly slice beef across the grain. Place salad onto serving platter, top with beef and drizzle with dressing. Sprinkle with coriander and serve.

 

Teriyaki beef

Ingredients (serves 4)                        1 serve = 1 protein

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 medium brown onion, chopped

2 garlic cloves, crushed

600g beef mince

1 tablespoon plain flour

1/4 cup teriyaki sauce

2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon brown sugar

150g snow peas, trimmed, sliced

3 green onions, thickly sliced

Toasted sesame seeds and steamed jasmine rice, to serve

Method

Heat vegetable oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add brown onion and garlic. Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until onion has softened. Add mince. Cook, stirring with a wooden spoon to break up mince, for 8 to 10 minutes or until browned and cooked through.

Add flour. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add teriyaki sauce, vinegar, sesame oil and sugar. Reduce heat to medium-low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until sauce thickens. Add snow peas and green onion. Cook for 2 minutes or until snow peas are tender. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve with rice.

Notes

Tip: For extra flavour, you could add 115g fresh baby corn, halved lengthways.

BEEF TOMATO CASSEROLE

Cooking oil spray            500g lean diced beef      2 onions, sliced     

2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 teaspoons ground cumin            

1 teaspoon ground coriander ¼ cup tomato paste        2 x 400g cans diced tomatoes

1/3 cup chopped fresh coriander   1/2 cup beef stock

1. Heat a large heavy-based pan; spray with cooking oil. Add beef, in batches, cook until browned all over. Remove from pan.

2. Add onions, garlic and spices; cook, stirring until onions are soft. Add remaining ingredients and beef; bring to boil.

3. Simmer casserole, covered, for about 11/2 hours or until beef is tender.

Serves 4          1 serve = 1 protein

 

Beef, cashew and Thai basil stir-fry

Ingredients (serves 4)                       1 serve = 1 fat, 1 protein

400g beef fillet, thinly sliced

2 red onions, cut into wedges

2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced

4cm piece ginger, peeled, cut into matchsticks

1 long fresh red chilli, thinly sliced

1 stalk lemongrass, white part only, thinly sliced

1 tsp Chinese five-spice

1 tbs peanut oil

1 tsp sesame oil

1/2 cup (125ml) oyster sauce

1/4 cup (60ml) chicken stock

1 bunch baby choy sum, trimmed

1 cup (145g) roasted unsalted cashew nuts

1 bunch Thai basil, leaves picked

Steamed jasmine rice, to serve

 

Method

Combine the beef, onion, garlic, ginger, chilli, lemongrass and five-spice in a large bowl.

Heat one quarter of the peanut oil in a wok over high heat until just smoking. Add one quarter of the beef mixture and stir-fry for 2 minutes or until the beef is browned. Transfer to a bowl. Repeat in 3 more batches with remaining beef mixture and oil, reheating wok between batches.

Heat the sesame oil in the wok. Add the beef mixture, oyster sauce, chicken stock and choy sum and stir-fry for 1-2 minutes or until heated through and the choy sum just wilts. Remove wok from heat. Add the cashew nuts and half the Thai basil and toss to combine.

Fish Recipes

Filed under: Fish — Arlene @ 4:05 am

Almond and dill crusted fish

Ingredients (serves 4)                                   1 serve = 1 protein

100g blanched almonds

1 teaspoon finely grated lime rind

1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped dill

20g softened butter

Salt and cracked black pepper

4 (about 180g each) firm white fish fillets

Method

Preheat oven to 200°C. Place the almonds in a food processor and process until finely chopped (a little rougher than the texture of almond meal).

Transfer to a clean bowl and add the lime rind, dill, butter, salt and cracked black pepper, mixing with your fingers until crumbly and just combined.

Place the fish on a baking tray lined with non-stick baking paper. Top with the almond mixture, pressing to help the mixture stick to the fish. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until golden and cooked through. Serve with salad leaves and lime wedges.

Notes

We used blue eye cod for this recipe, but any firm white fish such as barramundi, ling or perch can be used.

 

Asian braised fish with bok choy

Ingredients (serves 4)                                     1 serve = 1 protein

1 cup fish or vegetable stock                           1/2 cup fresh orange juice

1 small red chilli, deseeded, chopped              1/4 cup dark soy sauce

1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar                                    1 tablespoon honey

1 star anise                                                       4 x 150g blue-eye fillets

6 small bok choy, halved lengthways              coriander leaves, to serve

steamed jasmine rice, to serve

Method

Preheat oven to 160°C. Combine stock, orange juice, chilli, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, honey and star anise in a shallow frying pan over medium-high heat. Bring to the boil.

Add fish to frying pan. Reduce heat to low. Cover and cook for 5 minutes. Remove fish to a baking tray. Cover and keep warm in oven.

Increase stovetop heat to medium-high. Simmer orange juice mixture for 5 minutes, or until slightly thickened.

Meanwhile, steam bok choy over a saucepan of boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes, or until tender.

Divide bok choy between serving plates. Top with fish and spoon over pan juices. Sprinkle with coriander leaves and serve with rice.

 

Atlantic Salmon with Herb Crumble

2 x 150g Atlantic salmon fillets        1/3 cup stale white breadcrumbs

1 Tblsp lemon juice                           1 Tblsp finely chopped fresh parsley

1 Tblsp finely chopped fresh chives 1 clove garlic crushed

 

Cook fish, skin side up, under hot grill for 5 minutes, turn.

Sprinkle with combined breadcrumbs, juice, herbs and garlic; cook for about 5 minutes or until cooked through and lightly browned.  Serve with tossed salad if desired.

 

Serves 2               1 serve = 1 protein

 

 

Baked fish with tomatoes, olives and capers

Ingredients (serves 4)                                    1 serve = 1 protein, 2 tsp fat

4 x 175g ling fillets (or other firm skinless white fish such as blue-eye or snapper), skin removed

250g cherry tomatoes, halved                         100g pitted kalamata olives

2 tbs capers, rinsed, drained                           4 thyme sprigs

2 tbs extra virgin olive oil                               1-2 tbs balsamic vinegar

2 cups mixed salad leaves, to serve

Method

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Place the fish in a roasting pan, scatter with the tomatoes, olives, capers and thyme sprigs, then drizzle with the olive oil. Season with sea salt and pepper, then bake for 15 minutes. Remove pan from oven, cover with foil and leave to rest for 5 minutes.

Divide the fish, tomatoes and olives among 4 warmed plates. Stir the vinegar into the pan juices and spoon over the fish. Serve with salad leaves.

 

Baked fish with sticky sauce

Ingredients (serves 6)                                                1 serve = 1 protein

1 large (about 1 1/2kg) whole fish (such as snapper or ocean trout)

80ml (1/3 cup) vegetable oil

2 tbs sesame seeds

2 garlic cloves, sliced

1 small piece fresh ginger, peeled, cut into thin strips

2 long red chillies, seeded, thinly sliced

3/4 cup grated palm sugar*

120ml (6 tbs) fish sauce

4 tbs tamarind concentrate*

100ml (5 tbs) lime juice

1 cup Thai basil leaves

2 tbs fried Asian shallots*

Fresh coriander leaves, to garnish

Method

Preheat the oven to 190°C.

Make 3 deep slashes in one side of the fish, brush with oil and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Place in a greased baking dish and bake for 25 minutes.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wok over high heat. Add garlic and cook until golden (don’t burn or it will taste bitter). Transfer to paper towel to drain. Add ginger and chilli to wok and stir-fry for 1 minute, then add sugar, fish sauce, tamarind and lime juice. Cook for 1-2 minutes until syrupy. Transfer to a jug and set aside. Clean and dry wok. Add remaining oil over high heat. When hot, add Thai basil (ensure basil is completely dry) and fry for 1-2 minutes until crisp.

To serve, place fish on a platter, pour sauce over and garnish with garlic, basil, shallots and coriander.

Notes

* Available at Asian supermarkets.

 

 

 

BAKED FISH CUTLETS

1 onion, sliced

2 sticks celery, sliced

1 carrot, thinly sliced

2 medium potatoes, peeled, thinly sliced

1 x 415ml can tomato puree

salt and pepper to taste

4 x 150g fish cutlets

2 tablespoons finely grated parmesan cheese

1. Place onion, celery, carrot in a baking dish. Arrange potatoes in a single layer over onion mixture. Pour puree over top; season with salt and pepper.

2. Place fish cutlets in baking dish; turn to coat in tomato mixture. Cover with foil.

3. Cook in a moderate oven, 180oC, for about 30 minutes. Remove foil; sprinkle with cheese. Cook, uncovered, for a further 5 minutes.

Serves 4                       1 serve = 1 protein, 1 carbohydrate

 

Baked fish with roast onion & tomato

Ingredients (serves 4)                                    1 serve = 1 protein

2 x 240g punnets cherry tomatoes

2 large red onions, cut into thin wedges

2 tbs olive oil

4 (about 150g each) white fish fillets

80g (1/3 cup) bought basil pesto

Method

Preheat oven to 210°C. Line 2 roasting pans with non-stick baking paper. Place tomatoes, onion and 1 1/2 tablespoons of oil in 1 pan. Toss to coat. Roast in oven for 20 minutes.

Place the fish in the remaining pan. Drizzle over the remaining oil and season with salt and pepper.

Add the fish to oven and cook with vegetables for a further 8-10 minutes or until the fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.

Divide the tomato mixture and fish among serving plates. Top the fish with a dollop of pesto.

 

 

 

Baked salmon with lemon, thyme and asparagus

Ingredients (serves 4)                       1 serve = 1 protein

4 x 150g skinless salmon fillets                  1/4 cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil

1 lemon, thinly sliced                                  4 fresh thyme sprigs

2 tsp Dijon mustard                                   1 tbs white wine vinegar

3 tsp chopped fresh tarragon                     1/2 tsp caster sugar

2 bunches asparagus, trimmed

Method

Heat oven to 220°C. Lay four 30cm squares of baking paper on 2 baking trays. Place a salmon fillet on each, then top with lemon slices and a thyme sprig. Drizzle with 1 tsp oil and season. Fold the edges of the paper together to form well-sealed parcels. Bake for 15 minutes until cooked through.

Meanwhile, whisk the mustard, vinegar, tarragon, sugar and remaining oil in a jug. Season, then set the dressing aside.

Blanch the asparagus in a pan of lightly salted boiling water for 2 minutes until just tender. Drain well, then keep warm.

Arrange the salmon and blanched asparagus on plates, drizzle with the tarragon dressing and serve.

 

BAKED GREEK FISH

4 x 150g thick firm fish fillets

1 tablespoon basil pesto

3 small tomatoes, seeded, finely chopped

1 small red onion, finely chopped

1 tablespoon chopped capers

2 teaspoons grated lemon rind

¼ cup low-fat plain yoghurt

salt and a pepper to taste

1. Arrange fish in a single layer in an ovenproof dish.

2. Spread pesto over fish; sprinkle with tomatoes, onion, capers and rind.

3. Drizzle yoghurt over fish; season with salt and pepper.

4. Cook, uncovered, in a moderate oven, 180oC, for about 25 minutes or until fish is cooked through.

Serves 4                                   1 serve = 1 protein

 

Baked Trout with Onion and Artichokes

2 rainbow trout

6 artichoke hearts, drained, halve

1 small red Spanish onion, sliced

½ teaspoon fresh coriander chopped

½ teaspoon chopped fresh dill

1 tablespoon lemon juice

10 grams butter chopped

¼ teaspoon ground black peppercorns

 

Place each fish in centre of piece of greased foil. Sprinkle fish with remaining ingredients.  Fold foil around fish to form parcels, seal edges firmly; place parcels on oven tray.  Bake in moderate oven about 30 minutes or until fish are tender.

 

Serves 2                       1 serve = 1 protein

 

 

Message

Filed under: Messages — Arlene @ 4:04 am

WATCH PORTION SIZES!!!

 

THE EYE MOUTH GAP

 

Ask people what they ate yesterday, or even today, and odds are they’ll underestimate the amount. This discrepancy has been called the “eye-mouth gap”. Some research has found that obese people tend to eat twice as much as they report. But studies have shown that the great majority of us – even lean and athletic – underestimate our food intake. One national survey found that adults underestimate their daily diet, on average, by about 800 calories.  People also tend to think their diet is healthier than it is, according to surveys. The overestimate their intake of fruit and dairy products, for instance, but underestimate sweets, refined grains, oils and other fats.

 

Misreporting is usually unconsciously done, perhaps in response to social pressure, and also results from plain old wishful thinking. In addition, people really don’t know how much food they put on their plates.  If you’re trying to lose weight or improve your diet, don’t trust your eyes.  Weigh or measure your food to get a sense of what you are eating.  An accurate food diary does also help.

 

The effects of regular exercise on mental well-being alone could add as much as two or more years to your life.  Exercise works its miracles because it is good for almost every system in the body.  Although most of its effects are on physical health, it also works wonders for the psyche.  People who exercise several times a week, whether to a moderate or intense degree, have lower levels of stress, anger, anxiety, depression, all of which are linked to problems such as heart disease and an early death. 

 

The bonus is that once you experience greater mental well being, you are even more likely to engage in physical activity. So drag yourself out of that couch potato rut, and you’ll find it gets easier and easier to exercise and add years to your life.

 

Chicken Recipes

Filed under: Chicken — Arlene @ 4:04 am

Apricot chicken

Ingredients (serves 4)             1 serve = 1 protein, 1 carbohydrate

1/2 cup plain flour

1kg (8 pieces) skinless chicken cutlets or drumsticks, trimmed

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 large brown onion, peeled, cut into thin wedges

2 garlic cloves, crushed

1 tablespoon Moroccan seasoning blend

405ml can apricot nectar

1/2 cup Large Dried Apricots

1 cup couscous

1/3 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped

Method

Place flour and salt and pepper in a shallow dish. Lightly coat chicken pieces in seasoned flour, shaking off excess.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a deep, large, heavy-based frying pan over medium heat. Cook chicken, in batches, for 2 to 3 minutes each side or until golden. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with remaining chicken and oil. Cover and set aside.

Add onion and garlic to frying pan. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 to 4 minutes or until tender. Sprinkle Moroccan seasoning over onion and stir until well combined.

Stir in apricot nectar. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low. Return chicken to frying pan. Cover with a lid or double piece of foil. Cook for 20 minutes. Remove cover and add apricots, pushing them into the sauce. Cook, uncovered, for a further 20 to 25 minutes or until chicken is cooked through and sauce has thickened.

Meanwhile, place couscous in a heatproof bowl. Pour over 1 cup boiling water. Cover. Stand for 5 minutes or until water has been absorbed. Stir with a fork to separate grains. Spoon couscous onto plates. Spoon over chicken and sauce and sprinkle with parsley. Serve.

 

Asian-style chicken salad

Ingredients (serves 4)             1 serve = 1 protein

1L (4 cups) water

1 brown onion, halved

2 single chicken breast fillets

1 carrot, peeled, cut into matchsticks

150g snow peas, trimmed, thinly sliced

1 red capsicum, deseeded, thinly sliced

1/2 wombok (Chinese cabbage),hard core removed, finely shredded

3 green shallots, ends trimmed, thinly sliced diagonally

1/2 cup fresh coriander leaves

2 tbs fresh lime juice

1 tbs fish sauce

2 tsp brown sugar

1 fresh red chilli, deseeded, chopped

Method

Place water, onion and chicken in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and cook, covered, for 10 minutes or until cooked. Drain chicken and discard onion.

Place carrot and snow peas in a bowl. Cover with boiling water. Set aside for 1 minute or until bright green and tender crisp. Refresh under cold running water.

Shred chicken. Place chicken, carrot, snow peas, capsicum, wombok, shallot and coriander in a bowl. Combine lime juice, fish sauce, sugar and chilli in a jar. Pour over salad and combine. Divide among serving bowls to serve.

 

ASPARAGUS CHICKEN SALAD

4 x 50g pita pockets                                                                         olive oil spray

1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning                                           200g green beans, halved

2 bunches asparagus, coarsely chopped                                   1/3 cup frozen green peas

1 small red onion, thinly sliced                                                      1 cup firmly packed parsley leaves

1/2 cup semi-dried tomatoes, sliced                                            1/4 cup fat free Italian dressing

2 tablespoons olive oil                                                                      500g chicken tenderloins

1. Split bread in half horizontally. Spray cut-side lightly with oil; sprinkle evenly with seasoning. Place in a single layer onto oven trays.

3. Cook in a hot oven, 200oC, for about 10 minutes, or until crisp.

4. Meanwhile, boil, steam or microwave beans, asparagus and peas separately until tender; drain. Rinse under cold water; drain well.

5. Combine beans, asparagus, peas, onion, parsley, tomatoes and dressing in a large bowl; toss until combined.

6. Cook chicken on a heated, oiled grill plate until browned all over and tender. Stand chicken for 5 minutes; slice thickly.

7. To serve, divide bread evenly among plates. Top with salad mixture then chicken.

SERVES 4                                          1 serve = 1 protein, 2 carbohydrates

 

Balsamic vinegar chicken

Ingredients (serves 4)                                   1 serve = 1 protein

2 small (about 1kg each) chickens     1 bunch coriander

4 garlic cloves, crushed                      1 to 2 long green chillies, chopped

1/4 cup olive oil                                  1/3 cup balsamic vinegar

Green salad and lime wedges, to serve

Method

Cut chickens in half lengthways. Remove and discard back bones (you can ask a butcher to do this for you). Using a sharp knife, make a few cuts across each chicken. Place into a large glass or ceramic dish.

Wash coriander leaves, stems and roots. Dry well. Roughly chop leaves, roots and stems. Place into a food processor with garlic and chillies. Process until finely chopped. Add oil and vinegar. Process until combined. Season with salt and pepper. Pour mixture over chicken. Rub to coat. Cover. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight if time permits.

Remove chicken from fridge 20 minutes before cooking to bring back to room temperature. Preheat barbecue grill on high heat. Reduce heat to low. Place chicken, skin-side down, onto grill. Cover with barbecue hood or a large baking dish. Cook for 15 minutes. Turn. Cook, covered, for a further 12 to 15 minutes or until just cooked through. Remove from heat. Cover loosely with foil. Stand for 10 minutes. Serve with salad and lime wedges.

 

 

Barbecue chicken skewers

Ingredients (serves 6)             1 serve – 1 protein; ½ carbohydrate

1 x 225g can pineapple pieces in natural juice, strained, juice reserved

2 tbs tomato sauce                                       1 tbs soy sauce

1 garlic clove, crushed                        1 red capsicum, cut 2cm pieces

4 shallots, ends trimmed, cut into 3cm pieces

12 (about 800g) chicken tenderloins, cut into thirds crossways

Olive oil spray

Method

Combine the pineapple juice, tomato sauce, soy sauce and garlic in a bowl. Add chicken and turn to coat. Cover and place in the fridge for 1 hour to marinate.

Thread the capsicum, shallot, pineapple and chicken alternately onto skewers. Spray lightly with olive oil spray.

Preheat a barbecue flat plate or a large frying pan on medium-high. Cook, turning occasionally, for 10 minutes or until golden. Serve.

Notes & tips

You will need to soak 12 bamboo skewers in cold water for 15 minutes for this recipe.

Allow 1 hour marinating time.

 

Barbecued chicken in Lime Chilli Marinade

4 single skinless chicken breasts (600g)        

Cooking oil spray

2 Tablespoons chopped fresh coriander

1 lime

Lime Chilli Marinade

1/3 cup limejuice

1 clove garlic

2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger

1 Tablespoon low-salt soy sauce

1 small fresh red-chilli, finely chopped

2 spring onions, chopped

Combine all ingredients in bowl; mix well.

 

Pound chicken fillets with a mallet to an even thickness.  Combine chicken and marinade in bowl, cover, refrigerate several hours or overnight.

Drain chicken; discard marinade.  Heat barbecue or griddle pan, coat with cooking spray, add chicken, cook on both sides until browned and tender.  Sprinkle with coriander, serve with lime wedges.

 

Serves 4                1 serve = 1 protein

 

Barbecue marinated chicken fillets

Ingredients (serves 4)                       1 serve = 1 protein, 2 carbs

4 small chicken fillets

1/2 cup smoky barbecue sauce

500g Desiree potatoes, cut into 2cm pieces

3 corn cobs, peeled, washed

2 zucchini, trimmed, sliced lengthways into strips

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 garlic cloves

1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped

125g punnet cherry tomatoes

Method

Cut each chicken fillet in half through the centre to form 2 thinner fillets. Place into a ceramic dish. Pour over barbecue sauce. Turn to coat. Cover. Refrigerate for 30 minutes, if time permits. Heat barbecue plate and grill on medium-high heat.

Meanwhile, wash potatoes. Place into a microwave-safe dish. Cover. Microwave on HIGH (100%) power for 5 minutes. Drain well.

Place corn onto a microwave-safe plate. Cover. Cook for 6 minutes or until tender. Drain. Slice corn into 3cm-thick pieces. Place corn, potatoes and zucchini into a large bowl. Add oil, garlic, parsley, and salt and pepper. Toss to coat.

Cook potatoes, corn and zucchini on barbecue plate for 4 to 5 minutes, turning frequently, or until golden. Add tomatoes. Cook for 3 minutes or until warmed through.

Cook chicken on grill plate for 2 minutes each side or until just cooked through. Serve chicken with barbecued vegetables

 

Chargrilled moroccan chicken with roast carrot and chickpea salad

Ingredients                                                     Serves 4 (1 serve = 1 protein, 1 carbohydrate)

2 bunches baby (Dutch) carrots, trimmed, scrubbed      1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

4 x 120g skinless chicken breast fillets               1 tablespoon sumac (see note)

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar                                  1 garlic clove, crushed

1 teaspoon honey                                                         2 x 400g cans chickpeas, rinsed, drained

1/2 cup (80g) sunflower seeds, toasted             1 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves

Method

Preheat the oven to 180C. Spread the carrots on a baking tray in a single layer. Season, then drizzle over 1 tablespoon oil and 2 tablespoons water. Roast for 10-12 minutes until the carrots soften slightly.

Meanwhile, lightly oil a chargrill pan with the remaining olive oil. Heat over medium-high heat. Season the chicken with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper and rub with the sumac. Cook for 3-4 minutes each side until browned.

Remove the tray from the oven, turn the carrots then place the chicken on top. Roast for a further 10-12 minutes until the chicken is cooked through.

Step 4

Whisk the vinegar, garlic and honey together in a large bowl. Season, then add chickpeas, sunflower seeds, parsley and carrots and toss to combine. Divide salad among plates, then top with the chicken

 

Chargrilled Chicken with Warm Tomato Salad

4 breast fillets (120g each)                 2 Tblsp lime juice

¼ cup sweet chilli sauce                     2 cloves garlic, crushed

4 fresh kaffir lime leaves, shredded           1 Tblsp oil

2 medium brown onions, sliced thickly     2 Tblsp red wine vinegar

¼ cup sugar (55g)                         2 Tblsp sweet chilli sauce, extra

¼ cup water                                  ¼ cup orange juice

6 medium egg tomatoes cut in wedges     3 shallots sliced thickly      

1 Tblsp bottled jalapeno chillies, chopped coarsely

 

Combine chicken, juice, sauce, garlic and leaves in large bowl; toss to coat chicken in mixture.

Heat oil in large saucepan; brown onion, stirring, until just softened. Add vinegar and sugar; cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Stir in extra sauce, the water and juice; add tomato and chilli, stir until heated through.

Cook drained chicken, in batches, on heated oiled grill plate (or grill or bbq) until browned both sides and cooked through.  Cover to keep warm.

Serve chicken on warm tomato salad; top with green onion.

 

Serves 4                 1 serve = 1 protein.

 

Chicken, artichoke and rocket salad (low-fat)

Ingredients (serves 4)                                    1 serve = 1 protein

Juice of 1 lemon

2 garlic cloves, crushed

1/3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil

4 boneless chicken breast fillets

300g marinated artichokes, drained, quartered

2 tbs balsamic vinegar

2 tsp Dijon mustard

2 cups wild rocket

1/4 cup shaved parmesan

Lemon wedges, to serve

Method

Combine the lemon juice, garlic and 2 tablespoons of the oil in a non-metallic dish. Add the chicken fillets and coat with the marinade, then cover with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 180°C and lightly grease a baking tray.

Heat a chargrill or heavy-based frypan over high heat and cook the chicken for 3-4 minutes, turning once, until charred and nearly cooked through. Remove, place on the baking tray and cook in the oven for a further 5 minutes.

While the chicken is in the oven, place the artichokes on the chargrill or in the pan for 1-2 minutes, turning once, until lightly charred. Place in the oven to keep warm.

Mix together the remaining oil, balsamic vinegar and mustard, and season well. Remove the chicken and artichokes from the oven, allow the chicken to rest for a few minutes, then thickly slice.

Place the rocket in a large bowl with the chicken and artichokes, then toss together with the balsamic dressing. Divide between plates, scatter with shaved parmesan and serve with lemon wedges.

 

Chargrilled moroccan chicken with roast carrot and chickpea salad

Ingredients                                         Serves 4, 1 serve = 1 protein, 1 carbohydrate

2 bunches baby carrots, trimmed, scrubbed

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

4 x 120g skinless chicken breast fillets

1 tablespoon sumac

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar

1 garlic clove, crushed

1 teaspoon honey

2 x 400g cans chickpeas, rinsed, drained

1/2 cup (80g) sunflower seeds, toasted

1 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves

Method

Step 1

Preheat the oven to 180C. Spread the carrots on a baking tray in a single layer. Season, then drizzle over 1 tablespoon oil and 2 tablespoons water. Roast for 10-12 minutes until the carrots soften slightly.

Step 2

Meanwhile, lightly oil a chargrill pan with the remaining olive oil. Heat over medium-high heat. Season the chicken with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper and rub with the sumac. Cook for 3-4 minutes each side until browned.

Step 3

Remove the tray from the oven, turn the carrots then place the chicken on top. Roast for a further 10-12 minutes until the chicken is cooked through.

Step 4

Whisk the vinegar, garlic and honey together in a large bowl. Season, then add chickpeas, sunflower seeds, parsley and carrots and toss to combine. Divide salad among plates, then top with the chicken.

 

 

CHICKEN NOODLE SALAD

500g breast chicken fillets                        1 teaspoon Chinese five spice

1 x 200g hokkien noodles                          500g broccoli florets

1 medium red capsicum thinly sliced

115g packet fresh baby corn, halved lengthways

2 sticks celery, sliced                                 4 spring onions, sliced

DRESSING

1/2 cup honey soy dressing

1. Rub chicken fillets with five spice. Heat an oiled grill pan; add chicken, in a single layer, cook on both sides, until browned and cooked through. Remove from pan; cut into thin slices.

2. Place noodles in a bowl; cover with boiling water. Drain well.

3. Boil or steam broccoli until tender; drain well. Rinse under cold water; drain well.

4. Combine chicken, noodles, broccoli, capsicum, corn, celery and spring onions in a large bowl. Add dressing; toss well.

Serves 4                     1 serve = 1 protein, 2 carbohydrates

 

 

CHICKEN RISSOLES

500g minced chicken                                                    2 cloves garlic, crushed

3 teaspoons finely grated lemon rind                              3/4 cup chopped fresh dill, chopped

6 spring onions, finely sliced                                          1 cup spiral pasta

1 red capsicum, quartered                                             cooking oil spray

2 tablespoons drained baby capers                               1 x 100g packet baby rocket leaves

1/4 cup lemon juice                                                       salt and pepper to taste

1. Combine chicken, garlic, 1 teaspoon of the rind, half the dill and spring onions in a bowl. Using wet hands, shape chicken mixture into 8 rissoles. Cover; refrigerate for 30 minutes.

2. Add pasta to a large pan of boiling, salted water; boil, uncovered, until just tender; drain.

3. Cook capsicum on a heated, oiled grill pan until browned all over and tender. Stand for 5 minutes; slice thinly. Add rissoles to pan; cook on both sides until browned and cooked through.

4. Combine warm pasta, capsicum, oil, capers, rocket, juice and remaining rind, dill and spring onions in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper.

5. Serve rissoles on pasta mixture.

Serves 4                                               1 serve = 1 protein, 1 carbohydrate

 

 

Chicken with dates and couscous

Ingredients (serves 6)                                        1 serve = 1 protein, 2 carbohydrates

2 red onions

3 cloves garlic

6 chicken thigh fillets

1 Tblsp olive oil

8 fresh dates

1 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp ground cinnamon, plus 1 pinch extra

1 pinch saffron threads (optional)

400g can chopped tomatoes

250ml (1 cup) chicken stock

1 cinnamon quill

400g (2 cups) instant couscous

20g (1/4 cup) flaked almonds

1 tbs lemon juice

1/4 bunch coriander

Method

Peel onions and garlic, then thinly slice. Cut chicken thighs into thirds. Heat 1 tbs oil in a heavy-based casserole over medium heat. Add chicken and cook for 2 minutes each side or until browned. Transfer to a plate.

Return casserole to medium heat. Add onions, garlic and 1 tsp salt, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until softened. Meanwhile, cut dates in half, remove seeds, then thinly slice. Add cumin, ground cinnamon and saffron, if using, to onion mixture and cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until fragrant. Return chicken to casserole with tomatoes, stock, cinnamon quill and half the dates. Bring to a simmer, then cook, partially covered with a lid, for 15 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through.

Meanwhile, fill a kettle and bring to the boil. Place couscous in a bowl. Pour over 400ml boiling water, stir to combine, then cover tightly with plastic wrap. Set aside for 10 minutes or until water is absorbed.

Heat remaining 1 tbs oil in a pan over medium heat. Add remaining dates and almonds, and cook, tossing, for 3 minutes or until almonds are toasted. Stir in the lemon juice and extra ground cinnamon.

Fluff couscous with a fork, then divide among plates with chicken. Tear leaves from coriander, then scatter over chicken with almond mixture to serve.

 

Questions

Filed under: Questions — Arlene @ 4:02 am

Question

How can I help manage my child’s weight?  Our son is only 10 years old but is already overweight. I worry that he will only continue to gain weight and it will be much more difficult to lose weight an older age. How can I help manage his weight?

Answer

 

I can understand why you are concerned about your son as obesity is an enormous worry.  Ideally you should seek the advice of your local Accredited Practising Dietitian.

 

Try limiting ‘treat’ foods but continue to offer him healthy foods. A healthy eating plan limits foods that lead to weight gain. Foods that should be limited include these:

fats that are solid at room temperature (like butter and lard)

foods that are high in calories, sugar, and salt like sugary drinks, chips, cookies, fries, and candy

refined grains (white flour, rice, and pasta)

 

Just like adults, children should replace unhealthy foods with a variety of healthy foods, including these:

Fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and whole grains like brown rice

Fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products or substitutes, like soy beverages that have added calcium and vitamin D

Lean meats, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, soy products, and eggs

 

The following changes may help your child eat healthier at home:

Buy and serve more fruits and vegetables (fresh, frozen, canned, or dried). Let your child choose them at the store. Use a new fruit to make smoothies.

Buy fewer high-calorie foods like sugary drinks, chips, cookies, fries, and candy.

Offer your child water or low-fat milk instead of fruit juice.

Other ways to support healthy eating habits include these:

Make healthy choices easy. Put nutritious foods where they are easy to see and keep any high-calorie foods out of sight.

Eat fast food less often. When you do visit a fast food restaurant, encourage your family to choose the healthier options, such as salads with low-fat dressing.

Plan healthy meals and eat together as a family so you can explore a variety of foods together.

To help your child develop a healthy attitude toward food, try these ideas:

Don’t use food as a reward when encouraging kids to eat. Promising dessert to a child for eating vegetables, for example, sends the message that vegetables are less valuable than dessert.

Explain the reasons for eating whatever it is you are serving. Don’t make your child clean his or her plate.

Limit eating to specific meal and snack times. At other times, the kitchen is “closed.”

Avoid large portions. Start with small servings and let your child ask for more if he or she is still hungry.

 

Kids need about 60 minutes of physical activity a day, but this doesn’t have to happen all at once. Several short 10- or even 5-minute periods of activity throughout the day are just as good. If your children are not used to being active, encourage them to start with what they can do and build up to 60 minutes a day.

Here are some ways to help your child move every day:

Set a good example. Show your child that you are physically active and that you have fun doing it.

Encourage your child to join a sports team or class, such as basketball, dance, or soccer at school or at your local community or recreation centre.

If your child feels uncomfortable participating in activities like sports, help him or her find physical activities that are fun and not competitive, such as dancing to music, playing tag, jumping rope, or riding a bike.

Be active together as a family. Assign active chores such as making the beds, sweeping/raking, or vacuuming. Plan active outings such as a walk through a local park.

Kids spend a lot of time sitting down watching TV, playing video games, or using the computer or hand-held devices like cell phones. The following tips may help cut back on some of this inactive time:

Limit screen time to no more than 2 hours per day.

Help your child find fun things to do like acting out favorite books or stories, or doing a family art project.

Encourage your child to get up and move during TV commercials and discourage snacking when sitting in front of a screen.

 

Question

Can you please suggest sources of protein for Vegans as my daughter has just become one and I am finding it so difficult.

Answer

Vegans often struggle with getting enough protein into their diet. Try these three protein-packed options to boost your intake:

  1. Soy beans and soy bean products (soy milk, tempeh, tofu)
  2. Lentils and beans (kidney beans, baked beans, chickpeas)
  3. Nuts (including peanut better) 

    Question

    Can you suggest foods to fight aging?

    Answer

    You can fight aging from the inside. I will suggest seven proven foods to help keep the years at bay. Incorporating them into your diet can strengthen your body and mind, and minimise your risk of developing some of the common health problems associated with aging – like osteoporosis, heart disease, fading eyesight and even wrinkles.

  1. Antioxidants. Our bodies are contantly subjected to free radicals produced in the body by our metabolism or by environmental factors (such as UV rays) which damage our cells. Antioxidants mop up these free radicals and neutralise them, thus reducing the amount of damage they can cause. Common antioxidants include Vitamins A, C and E; selenium, flavonoids, polyphenols and other phytochemicals. Eating 2 serves of fruit and 5 serves of veges will boost your antioxidant intake and help slow the aging process.
  2. Omega-3. As we age our arteries can start to narrow and harden due to build-up of plaque – meaning the heart has to work harder to pump blood, which can lead to a heart attack. Omega-3 help your heat beat more regularly, helps prevent plaque-build up in the arteries and reduces inflammation – which lowers the risk of a clot forming. Salmon is the best source of omega-3. Oily fish 2-3 times a week.
  3. Protein. Over the age of 60 the body is less able to prevent muscle breakdown and build new muscles, which means one can lose up to 40% of your muscle mass. Muscle is not only important for strength and mobility, but also for basic movement, such as getting from a chair or cleaning you teeth. Lean red meat, is packed with quality protein to help maintain muscle mass, a good source of zinc, which helps wound healing and immunity. Is also rich with vitamins and minerals like vitamin B6, folate and iron – which many older people don’t get enough of.
  4. Fibre. Age is one of the few known risks of bowel cancer. Insoluble fibre like that found in wheat bran isn’t digested until it reaches the bowel, where healthy bacteria convert it into compounds that help prevent the development of cancerous cells in the bowel.
  5. Calcium. Calcium is not only necessary to build and maintain strong bones and teeth, it is also needed to keep your heart, muscles and nerves healthy. If you are not getting enough calcium the body takes it from your bones which can lead to osteoporosis. Have at least 3-4 serves of dairy products daily.
  6. Beta Glucan. The beta glucan fibre in oats helps keep blood glucose levels lower for a longer time during the day. If you have pre-diabetes or are overweight, managing your blood glucose levels may reduce your chance of developing the disease. Oats also contains soluble fibre, which helps lower LDL (or ‘bad’) cholesterol and blood pressure, and slows digestion, which keeps you feeling fuller for longer to help maintain a healthy weight. It also helps maintain bowel regularity, which reduces your risk of bowel cancer.
  7. Tomatoes. The risk of prostate cancer – which is more likely to occur in older rather than younger men – may decrease with an increased intake of the carotenoid lycopene (most commonly found in tomatoes). Research has found that eating tomatoes is associated with a reduced risk of developing prostate, as well and lung and stomach cancer. Research also suggests that both men and women who eat tomato-based foods are less likely to suffer from cardiovascular diseases, such as high blood pressure and stroke. 

    Question

    I was surprised to find out that I am deficient in Vitamin D.  How can I prevent this?

    Answer

    Even though there are some dietary sources of vitamin D available there is not enough in an average diet to account for more than 5-10% of what you need. In other words focus on getting sun exposure – which will vary depending on the time of the year. You need sun exposure on 20% of your body surface (i.e. face, arms and hands) on most days. In winter go outside for about 20 minutes. Walk briskly and roll up your sleeves so you can get more skin exposure, and do it most days. If you have a darker skin, you will need 3-6 times longer in the sum. Your doctor may also recommend vitamin D supplementation especially as you get older.

    Question

    What is the difference between Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes?

    Answer

    Diabetes occurs when the amount of sugar in your blood is too high because the hormone insulin is not present, or doesn’t work as well as it should. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the pancreas is attacked by the body and cannot produce enough insulin to control the blood sugar levels. It usually develops in childhood and accounts for about 10-15% of diabetics. Symptoms appear suddenly and include excessive thirst, urination, weight loss, fatigue, weakness, muscle cramps, blurred vision, and slow healing of cuts. Type 1 diabetes requires lifelong daily insulin injections, and there is presently no cure or prevention.

    Type 2 Diabetes occurs when the insulin made by your pancreas doesn’t work well as it should, resulting in more sugar (glucose) in the blood than normal. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes can be prevented, delayed, improved and even put into remission with a healthy diet, active lifestyle, weight loss and careful management.

     

     

Message

Filed under: Messages — Arlene @ 4:01 am

 

WATCH PORTION SIZES!!!

 

THE EYE MOUTH GAP

 

Ask people what they ate yesterday, or even today, and odds are they’ll underestimate the amount. This discrepancy has been called the “eye-mouth gap”. Some research has found that obese people tend to eat twice as much as they report. But studies have shown that the great majority of us – even lean and athletic – underestimate our food intake. One national survey found that adults underestimate their daily diet, on average, by about 800 calories.  People also tend to think their diet is healthier than it is, according to surveys. The overestimate their intake of fruit and dairy products, for instance, but underestimate sweets, refined grains, oils and other fats.

 

Misreporting is usually unconsciously done, perhaps in response to social pressure, and also results from plain old wishful thinking. In addition, people really don’t know how much food they put on their plates.  If you’re trying to lose weight or improve your diet, don’t trust your eyes.  Weigh or measure your food to get a sense of what you are eating.  An accurate food diary does also help.

 

The effects of regular exercise on mental well-being alone could add as much as two or more years to your life.  Exercise works its miracles because it is good for almost every system in the body.  Although most of its effects are on physical health, it also works wonders for the psyche.  People who exercise several times a week, whether to a moderate or intense degree, have lower levels of stress, anger, anxiety, depression, all of which are linked to problems such as heart disease and an early death. 

 

The bonus is that once you experience greater mental well being, you are even more likely to engage in physical activity. So drag yourself out of that couch potato rut, and you’ll find it gets easier and easier to exercise and add years to your life.

 

Menu for Quick Weight Loss

Filed under: Diet Menu — Arlene @ 3:58 am

 

 

 

MENU

 

Day 1

Breakfast:                    1 scrambled  egg ,1 slice toast, grilled tomato, mushrooms, spinach

Morning Tea:               1 small mango

Lunch:                         Cheese and salad sandwich

Afternoon Tea:            1 corn on the cob (in microwave for 4 minutes)

Dinner:                        150g grilled fish with veges (2cups)

Supper:                        1 scoop ice cream / 1 cup blueberries

Day 2

Breakfast:                    2 weetbix / 2/3 cup wholegrain cereal

Morning Tea:               3 prunes

Lunch:                         turkey and salad wrap

Afternoon Tea:            1 Nectarine

Dinner:                        120g Roast chicken breast and salad

Supper:                        Jarrah hot chocolate/ 125g tinned fruit

Day 3

Breakfast:                    1 toast, drizzle honey, sliced banana

Morning Tea:               200g low fat yoghurt

Lunch:                         Sandwich on two slices with chicken, mustard and salad

Afternoon Tea:            1Peach

Dinner:                        100g Grilled steak and salad

Supper:                        Jarrah/Swiss Miss/Cadbury Lite hot/sliced orange

Day 4

Breakfast:                    1egg on toast

Morning Tea:               1 small mango

Lunch:                         Tuna salad

Afternoon Tea:            100g fruche

Dinner:                        ½ cup chicken casserole with 1 cup cooked rice and salad

Supper:                        15 grapes

Day 5

Breakfast:                    2/3 cup cereal

Morning Tea:               2 kiwi fruit

Lunch:                         miso soup, 2 sushi rolls

Afternoon Tea:            30g chocolate / small pear

Dinner:                        150g Grilled fish and veges

Supper:                        low joule jelly/ 2 cups popcorn

Day 6

Breakfast:                    1 slice raisin toast with ricotta

Morning Tea:               2 sweet biscuits/ 100g fruche-lite / 200g yoghurt

Lunch:                         Chicken burger

Afternoon Tea:            1 banana

Dinner:                        120g roast beef and veges/salad

Supper:                        mandarin

Day 7

Breakfast:                    1 cup cereal

Morning Tea:               1 cup berries

Lunch:                         Greek salad with 60g feta cheese and 6 kalamata olives

Afternoon Tea:            1 cup soup

Dinner:                        Stir fry veges with 100g tofu/120g chicken/100g beef

Supper:                        jarrah hot chocolate/swiss miss/ lite ovaltine and low joule jelly

 

Daily:  2 cups low fat milk; 2 teaspoons fat

 

MINDFUL EATING

Filed under: Article — Arlene @ 3:53 am

MINDFUL EATING

 

Mindful Eating is a simple-to-learn life skill which can lead people to enjoy a satisfying, healthy and enjoyable relationship with food. It is a skill that can help people break free from ‘food rules’ and begin to enjoy healthy, flexible and relaxed eating practices.

 

Mindful eating is not a diet. Mindful eating is about the way we eat, not what we eat.

 

WHAT IS MINDFUL EATING?

Being mindful helps people focus their attention and awareness on the present moment, helping them disconnect from habitual, unsatisfying and harmful habits and behaviours. Mindful eating put simply, is the opposite of mindless eating. The Mindful Eating approach employs strategies which can rewire the way we respond to food, both physically and emotionally. Adopting a Mindful Eating mentality involves:

• Being aware of the positive and nurturing opportunities of food preparation and consumption;

• Choosing to eat food that is both pleasing and nourishing to the body by using your senses to explore, savour and taste;

• Acknowledging responses to food without judgement;

• Being aware of physical hunger and satiety cues to guide decisions to start and stop eating;

• Identifying personal triggers for mindless eating whether it be emotions, social pressures or certain foods.

 

WHY TRY MINDFUL EATING?

Extensive research shows that Mindful Eating can help people control binge eating and overeating, enjoy food and feel more in touch with the body’s internal hunger and satiety signals. A lot of us may not be aware of the reasons we engage in mindless eating. Some common contributors can be:

• Not recognising the difference between hungry and non-hungry eating;

• Not stopping to listen to what your body signals are telling you;

• Confusing hunger and thirst;

 

 

Mindful Eating

• Allowing yourself to get too hungry and/ or eating too fast;

• Eating an amount that should make you feel full, but not feeling satisfied;

• Eating in case you get hungry at a later stage;

• Eating in response to emotions;

• Eating to allay a state of mind such as boredom or tiredness.

The Mindful Eating approach employs strategies which can counteract these influences by encouraging awareness of the senses while eating to bring you into the present moment. These strategies include keeping a mindful journal, slowing down while eating, focusing on eating – not watching television or reading, and mindful food shopping and preparation. Mindless eating is common because from a very early age we are trained to eat in response to external cues (time of day, availability of certain foods, for comfort, to alleviate boredom, out of habit, to clear our plate, as a reward) rather than in response to hunger. An increasing body of research now indicates that many of the behaviours associated with Mindless eating do contribute to both weight gain and eating disorders

 

 

MINDFUL EATING TECHNIQUES

Mindful Eating techniques can help reduce the likelihood of binge eating. These include:

1. Eating small or moderate amounts of food every 2-3 hours.

2. Before eating asking a few basic questions

a. Am I hungry?

b. Am I thirsty?

c. If so, what type of food/drink do I want?

3. Setting a nice place to eat and arranging food nicely on the plate. DO NOT EAT STANDING OR WALKING

4. Being in the present (3 deep breaths) before beginning to eat

5. Eating slowly, paying attention to the smell, taste, sound, texture and look of the food.

6. Put utensils or food down between mouthfuls.                                           

7. Every few minutes check in with your hunger signals

8. Stop eating just before you feel full and wait 10- 20 minutes before eating more food if you are still hungry.

9. ENJOY YOUR MEAL!!!! If you don’t enjoy eating you will never be satisfi ed.

 

 

You might also like to try journaling, which is a Mindfulness based practice. Any form of writing or journaling can increase mindfulness. A person should use a method or technique of journaling that suits them and is sustainable over a long period of time. Some people like to carry a notebook or journal around with them; some people keep a journal to write in before they go to bed. Others keep a food diary or notes on their computer. It doesn’t really matter what you write, it can be a list of foods you ate, a poem, a description of your feelings or a drawing. Yoga, Meditation and Walking Meditation are also mindfulness based activities you might like to try. Here is a simple mindful eating exercise you can do at home to practice the skill of eating mindfully.

1. Choose one piece of food. It might be a raisin, a slice of mandarin, a potato chip or a chocolate.

2. Begin by looking at the food. Examine the shape, colour and texture.

3. Bring the food to your nose and smell it.

4. Place the food on your tongue. Notice the response of your salivary glands.

5. Take a bite and be aware of the sounds in your mouth and the texture on your tongue.

6. Notice how the texture of the food changes as you chew.

7. Now swallow. Pay attention as the food travels down your throat to your stomach.

8. Now say the name of the food silently to yourself.

9. Try practicing a mindful bite at least once every meal.

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