arlenesway.com.au Loose weight with Arlene Normand

December 10, 2016

Motivational Message

Filed under: Messages — Arlene @ 8:54 pm

IT IS HARD TO LOSE WEIGHT!

 

The contemporary lifestyle is a comfortable, but dangerous one.  We live in an ‘obesogenic environment’ – everything in our lives conspires to make us put on weight!

 

Here is what has changed in the last 20 years:

  • We watch too much TV.
  • We use labour-saving gadgets in the garden and kitchen.
  • We drive everywhere.
  • We walk and cycle less frequently.
  • We work more in areas of technology and mechanisation and less in manual jobs.
  • We lack the time to cook easy meals.
  • When we find the time to cook, we no longer know how to cook healthily.
  • Cheap junk food, alcohol and soft drinks are widely available.
  • Food and drink come in bigger portion sizes.
  • There is greater marketing of high kilojoule soft drinks and fast foods.
  • The fresh vegetables and salads need to be prepared – often we are too lazy to do this, it is easier to grab processed foods.

 

No wonder it seems so difficult to keep the weight off!!!  You have to exercise a lot of self discipline to make the right choices, keep your portions small and be as active as possible.

 

Have a great and healthy week where you feel strong healthy and fit!

 

Best Wishes

Arlene

www.arlenesway.com.au

 

Menu for Weight Loss

Filed under: Messages — Arlene @ 8:53 pm

 

 

 

MENU FOR WEIGHT LOSS

 

Day 1

Breakfast:                    2/3 cup cereal

Morning Tea:               1 small nectarine

Lunch:                         Cheese and salad sandwich

Afternoon Tea:            1 small peach

Dinner:                        150g grilled fish with veges (2cups)

Supper:                        ice block / 12 cherries

Day 2

Breakfast:                    1 toast with poached egg and tomato

Morning Tea:               1 plum

Lunch:                         Tuna and salad wrap

Afternoon Tea:            2 fresh apricots

Dinner:                        120g Roast chicken breast and salad

Supper:                        Jarrah hot chocolate/ small mango

Day 3

Breakfast:                    1 slice raisin toast with 2 Tblsp cottage cheese and honey

Morning Tea:               200g low fat yoghurt

Lunch:                         Sandwich on two slices with turkey, cranberry jelly and salad

Afternoon Tea:            2 plain biscuits/ 2 rice cakes with tomato and black pepper

Dinner:                        100g Grilled steak and salad

Supper:                        Jarrah/Swiss Miss/Cadbury Lite hot/125g tinned fruit

Day 4

Breakfast:                    1 scrambled egg with tomato and mushrooms

Morning Tea:               2 fresh apricots

Lunch:                         Greek salad

Afternoon Tea:            small apple

Dinner:                        1 cup pasta with napoletana sauce with salad

Supper:                        3 squares chocolate / poached pear

 

Day 5

Breakfast:                    1 banana with 5 Tblsp cottage cheese and a drizzle of honey

Morning Tea:               1 cup berries

Lunch:                         miso soup, 2 sushi rolls

Afternoon Tea:            15 grapes

Dinner:                        150g Grilled fish and salad

Supper:                        low joule jelly

Day 6

Breakfast:                    1 toast with ricotta and tomato

Morning Tea:               2 sweet biscuits/ 200g low fat yoghurt

Lunch:                         Chicken burger

Afternoon Tea:            5 passionfruit

Dinner:                        Stir fry chicken and vegetables

Supper:                        1 baked apple with ½ cup low fat custard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 7

Breakfast:                    1 cup cereal

Morning Tea:               1 mango

Lunch:                         Tuna salad

Afternoon Tea:            peach

Dinner:                        Stir fry vegetables with 100g tofu/100g beef

Supper:                        jarrah hot chocolate/swiss miss/ lite ovaltine and low joule jelly

 

Daily:  2 cups low fat milk; 2 teaspoons fat

 

Questions

Filed under: Messages — Arlene @ 8:52 pm

Question

I have dreadful sweet cravings and wondered if this indicates there is something missing from my diet.  I became a vegetarian a year ago, and thought that this could perhaps be causing this desire for lollies, chocolates, cakes and biscuits which I previously never felt like.  These cravings are mainly in the latter part of the day.

Answer

It would be necessary for me to analyse your overall diet before I could determine whether your intake is deficient in any of the vitamins or minerals.  When the cravings occur later in the day, it is often due to a drop in blood sugar levels, which may be due to not eating sufficient throughout the day.  I would suggest you eat six small meals during the day, and try to satisfy the sweet cravings with nutritious foods such as fruit or yoghurt.  In addition, when one is tired you experience sweet cravings.  Ensure that you are not iron deficient, or perhaps you lack sleep or are doing too much.

 

Question

I am always trying to lose weight and have just been reading a book on food combining.  What do you think of this diet?  I am so desperate to “shrink” that I will try anything.  I do not understand it, but they give menus that I can follow.  Can you explain how it works and if you think it is healthy or not?

Answer

The concept behind food combining diets is that proteins require acids to digest and carbohydrates require alkali, so mixing the two creates incorrect digestion – and one of the consequences is obesity.  Should you subscribe to this diet, you can say good-bye to toasted cheese and tomato sandwiches, meat and potatoes, lamb curry and rice and spaghetti bolognaise.  The notion that starch foods need an alkaline solution while protein foods need an acid environment is rubbish.  The stomach is an acid environment and has a pH of 1; so all foods entering the stomach experience this intense acid.  In addition, there is hardly a single food that is pure protein or pure carbohydrate.  Most foods, whether they classify them as carbohydrates, proteins, or fats are a combination.  Breads, all grains and cereal foods, legumes, nuts and milk contain protein and carbohydrate within the same food.  This diet is not recommended; it carries a high risk of you becoming nutrient deficient.  We should be combining foods rather than separating them.  The body is perfectly equipped to cope with such mixtures.  In addition, if you are participating in sport, it may provide insufficient energy.

 

Question

How is Obesity diagnosed?

Answer

The most common way to find out whether you’re overweight or obese is to figure out your body mass index (BMI). BMI is an estimate of body fat, and it’s a good gauge of your risk for diseases that occur with more body fat.

BMI = weight (in kilograms) / height (in metres) squared

For  example, if you weigh 70 kg and are 1.7 metres tall:

70/ (1.7)squared = 24

According to the table below you would fall into the high level of normal range.

The higher your BMI, the higher your risk of disease. BMI is calculated from your height and weight. These BMI ranges apply to adults and are not applicable to children under 18.

What Does Body Mass Index Mean?

BMI
18.5–24.9 Normal weight
25.0–29.9 Overweight
30.0–39.9 Obese
40.0 and above Extreme obesity

Although BMI can be used for most men and women, it does have some limits. It may overestimate body fat in athletes and others who have a muscular build. BMI also may underestimate body fat in older people and others who have lost muscle.

Another way to check wheth3er you are a healthy size is to measure your waist circumference as a check on your abdominal fat. If you have a waist measurement of 94cm + (men) or 80 cm + (for women) you are at an increased risk of developing problems such as heart disease and diabetes due to excess abdominal fat.

Question

What foods cause heartburn?

Answer

What foods should you avoid?

  • Acidic foods – citrus fruits and tomato products may trigger your heartburn because they take longer to digest and increase the amount of stomach acid produced.
  • Heartburn beverages – coffee, alcohol, carbonated drinks, acidic fruit juices and tomato juice may cause heartburn. Many of these drinks also contain excess calories that can contribute to weight gain. Instead, opt for non-citrus juices, water and tea.

Question

What is Gastric Banding?

Answer

Gastric banding is surgery to help with weight loss. The surgeon places a band around the upper part of your stomach to create a small pouch to hold food. The band limits the amount of food you can eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food.

After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band to make food pass more slowly or quickly through your digestive system.

Question

W7hat is heartburn?

Answer

Heartburn, also known as acid reflux, is a painful and burning sensation in the oesophagus, just behind the breastbone usually associated with regurgitation of gastric acid (gastric reflux). The pain often rises in the chest and may radiate to the neck, throat, or angle of the jaw. Heartburn is a major symptom of gastro oesophageal reflux disease, otherwise known as GERD; acid reflux is also identified as one of the causes of chronic cough, and may even mimic asthma. Despite its name, heartburn actually has nothing to do with the heart; it is so called because of a burning sensation near to where the heart is located – although some heart problems may give rise to a similar burning sensation.

 

Question

How Do Unhealthy Fats in Your Diet Contribute to High Cholesterol?

Answer

Foods like cheese, butter, sausage, biscuits, cakes, and desserts may taste good to you, but they can have a lot of saturated fat and cholesterol. Eating too much of these unhealthy fats could lead to high cholesterol and heart disease.

Start with small changes first. Use heart-healthy olive or canola oil instead of butter for cooking. Drink fat-free or low-fat milk instead of 2% milk or whole milk. Pick leaner cuts of meat.

 

Eating foods that contain saturated fats or trans fats can raise the LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in your blood. Having a high level of LDL cholesterol increases your chance of clogged arteries (atherosclerosis), which can lead to coronary artery disease and heart attack.

Trans fats also are unhealthy. Try as much as possible to avoid eating them. Trans fat raises the level of “bad” LDL cholesterol in your blood and lowers the “good” HDL cholesterol in your blood.

HDL cholesterol is important. It helps clear the bad cholesterol from your blood so it does not clog your arteries. A high level of HDL can lower your risk of having a heart attack.

Remember, your body needs some fat to be healthy. Use the example below as a guide for eating less saturated fat.

In general:

No more than 10% of your daily calories should come from saturated fat. This is about 20 grams of fat in a 2,000-calorie diet.

No more than 10% of your daily calories should come from polyunsaturated fat. This is about 20 grams in a 2,000-calorie diet.

Monounsaturated fats can be up to 15% of your daily calories. This is about 25 to 30 grams in a 2,000-calorie diet.

If you’re not sure how much fat you should be eating or how many calories you need each day to stay at a healthy weight, talk to an Accredited Practising Dietitian who can help you create a plan that’s right for you.

Question

What is the Difference between Vegetariansim and Vegansim?

Answer

By definition, vegetarians are those individuals that do not eat any meat products (meat, chicken, fish), they will however, eat dairy products and eggs. Vegans on the other hand, do not consume any animal products at all! Or derivatives of such. So guess where an egg comes from? A Chicken! And milk? A cow! So you can cross both eggs and milk off your list. The Vegan diet walks a hard thin line.

Question

How can I lose the weight since becoming menopausal?

Answer

Menopause occurs when a woman stops ovulating and her monthly period (menstruation) ceases. Menopause actually means the last menstrual period. The average age of the natural menopause is 51 years, but can occur much earlier or later. Menopause that occurs before the age of 45 is called early menopause and before the age of 40 is premature menopause.

At this time, most women (around 2/3 of women) experience weight gain or difficulty maintaining their usual weight. Most women will gain about 5-7 kilos during their menopausal years. You also discover that the weight gain tends to accumulate around the abdomen, rather than the hips and thighs as before menopause. People commonly refer to this as an “apple” shape, because the stomach area becomes rounder. An extra kilo before menopause will settle evenly over hips, bottom, thighs, and arms. After menopause, it all goes round the middle! Most of this weight will come on gradually – generally about a ½ kilo a year.

As you enter the early stages of menopause, maintaining weight becomes more and more difficult, and losing weight becomes almost impossible. This is because of the fluctuation in your hormones. Your body’s hormones have a direct impact on your appetite, metabolism, and fat storage. At this stage, women can develop “insulin resistance” making their bodies store fat, rather than burn calories. This “insulin resistance” changes how our bodies handle the foods we eat. For example, if you ate 1,000 calories before menopause, you would burn 700 of them and store around 300. After menopause, your body will store 700 and burn only 300! This is a big difference, and the result is weight gain! Even a modest weight gain can result in a change of dress size.

Excessive weight gain could also be a sign that something is wrong with your hormone levels, blood sugars, or eating habits. Visit your doctor if your weight gain is out of control. Excessive fat stored around the abdomen can lead to an increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, breast cancer, and high cholesterol.

Here are a few tips to help you:

Reduce calories. Menopausal women need fewer calories to maintain former body weight. It may be necessary to cut calorie intake by 10 to 15 percent while at the same time increasing level of activity or exercise. If women don’t reduce their calorie intake, they are over eating. Calories needs are the highest during the mid-20s. The daily calorie needs, as women age, then reduce at about 2% to 4% for every 10 years added. Eat a balanced diet. Avoid refined sugars and indulge in fruits and vegetables. Choose foods low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol. Fat intake should be less than 30 percent of daily calorie intake. Women of all ages should consume 20 to 30 grams of fibre daily.

 

Portion Control. Eat slowly and practice portion control – this does not mean you have to eliminate your favourite foods. Just eat smaller quantities.

Avoid crash or fad diets. Starvation will only cause your metabolism to slow down, causing you to gain more weight later on. Fad diets simply don’t work — over 95% of dieters gain back the weight they lose and more.

 

Maintain adequate intake of water: So many of the bodily functions rely on the body being adequately hydrated. Drinking 6 to 8 glasses daily is ideal. New studies say that you can drink tea and coffee as part of your daily water requirements. A couple of cups a day are fine as part of your water intake. We are talking about black coffee, not coffee house drinks.

 

Don’t lose large amounts of weight. There is a balance between being too thin and just right. Being very thin can lead to an increased chance of developing osteoporosis.

 

Increase your physical activity. Exercise becomes particularly important as a woman ages. Regular exercise benefits the heart and bones, helps regulate weight, and can be a mood enhancer, creating a better sense of well-being. Women who are physically inactive are more likely to suffer from coronary heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Weight loss still requires that you burn more calories each day than you take in. Do aerobics to increase your metabolism and burn fat. Do weight bearing activities such as walking and cycling to increase muscle mass and ward off osteoporosis. When women diet to lose weight after menopause, they will not be able to continue to lose weight unless exercise is added to the daily routine. Exercise prevents the decrease in metabolism that occurs when women diet without exercising. But, you must exercise consistently, preferably daily. Start with 5 minutes of walking each day and work to gradually increase the duration of whatever exercise you are doing. Work to increase your exercise time to 60 minutes daily.

The No Weight Gain During The Festive Season

Filed under: Article — Arlene @ 8:50 pm

THE NO-WEIGHT-GAIN FESTIVE GUIDE

 

Holidays can trigger imbalance and excess. Come the festive season, some of us indulge in a six-week feeding frenzy; others go the other way and act like Grinch. Here are some useful tips for keeping the party season in perspective:

 

  1. Take the ‘80/80’ approach. Instead of aiming for 100 percent, give yourself some leeway at this time of year. Shooting for ‘everything healthy all of the time’ is a sure-fire route to failure. Allow yourself some leeway instead, and you will have more fun and feel better at the start of the New Year. If you slip and violate your own rules occasionally, take it in your stride.
  2. Choose your indulgences. Don’t waste kilojoules on treats you can get any time of the year. Make every calorie count! Have the once-a-year pleasures.
  3. Schedule time to stave off stress. Pencil in some “me” time and exercise. Get stressed out, and you’ll be too exhausted to make good food choices.
  4. Replace your evening trip to the kitchen with a relaxation ritual. During the holidays it is especially important to cultivate calm. Putting the key in the door and going straight to the fridge is a habit worth changing. Instead, dim the lights; sit in your cushiest chair; and just be for a few minutes.
  5. Practise saying “no thanks”. You may have to massage the truth to get out of parties or other events you don’t want to attend, but it is worth the calories and stress you’ll save? Can’t skip an event altogether? Just drop by – then scoot out! As for the endless invitations to eat, recognise that what you put in your mouth is your business and nobody else’s.
  6. Sit down – and enjoy. Use a plate and sit down to eat. Give everything you eat your complete attention. Practice mindful eating. If you eat something distractedly, it does not register.
  7. Avoid temptation traps. Toss left-overs and quickly re-gift food presents or pass them along to friends or co-workers. It is OK to get rid of all festive-food temptations.
  8. Remember that exercise is not a license to eat. Feeling virtuous because you worked out before the party? Good for you. But if you think that gives you leeway to down one of everything, you are fooling yourself.

Happy holidays!

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